Cemetery

by Ron Gilbert
Jul 27, 2016

We added a cemetery to the game. The decision was made a few months ago, but we only just got the art.  I thought I'd talk about why we added it so late and the decisions that lead up to that.

I'm going to dance around a few spoilers here, so bare (or is it bear... English is stupid) with me.

There are a lot of dead people in Thimbleweed Park, it's a twisty little mystery that begins with the body found in the river just outside of town.  A few days before our story gets started, the owner of the local pillow factory, beloved founding father of Thimbleweed Park, and Delores's Uncle, died of a heart attack. It's an important plot point, but just mentioning it in dialog wasn't getting the it across.

There is an old adage: show don't tell.  So what we decided to do was add a cemetery that you come across before entering the town that has a giant tomb, adorned with flowers from the recent funeral, for our beloved town leader.

Once we added the cemetery, other ideas started to pop up. There was a puzzle chain involving Franklin that always felt a little contrived, and now that we had a cemetery, we could adjust the puzzle to make it more interesting.

Franklin, being a ghost who's stuck in the hotel always limited his usefulness. Adding the cemetery provided a (logical) place that he could go beyond the hotel. So, we add another puzzle to allow him to move between the two places.

Another benefit of the cemetery was it made the reading of Delores's Uncle's will a lot more interesting, since it could take place in his tomb and added a new puzzle to get into the tomb.

The cemetery started out as an idea to solve a story issue, but blossomed into a great room that added several new and interesting puzzles.

Also, cemeteries are cool.

- Ron


Thimbleweed Park Podcast #57

by Ron Gilbert
Jul 24, 2016

Capping a very busy week on Team Thimbleweed, it's a podcast.

You can also subscribe to the Thimbleweed Park Podcast RSS feed if that's 'your thing'.

You can also get the podcast directly from iTunes.

- Ron


Thimbleweed Park Podcast #56

by Ron Gilbert
Jul 17, 2016

It's a podcast. About Thimbleweed Park. It's the 56th one. You don't need to know anything more.

You can also subscribe to the Thimbleweed Park Podcast RSS feed if that's 'your thing'.

You can also get the podcast directly from iTunes.

- Ron


Eyes

by Ron Gilbert
Jul 12, 2016

In the original Maniac Mansion, heads were large because pixels on the C64 were very huge. Due to the color mode we were using, they were not even square pixels, they were twice as wide as tall.  The hardware sprites each character had to fit in were 24 pixel wides, so Gary just made the heads as wide as he could to capture the personality of the characters.

There are huge parts of our brains that are dedicated to recognizing faces and subtle movements and expresses. How do I know this? Because I'm not only a game designer, I'm also an evolutionary neurological cognitive brain scientist. Look it up.

When Zak came out, the heads were shrunk to be "more realistic". By the time Monkey Island was made, the heads had gotten even smaller.  True, it was more realistic, but I felt something was lost.

Guybrush didn't blink and he didn't move his eyes (except in some special case animations).  Razor, Bernard and Micheal didn't blink either. Or move their eyes. Everyone stared straight ahead like zombies.

A month ago we added blinking to the Thimbleweed Park characters and it really changed how you feel about the game being alive. When someone is just standing, the blinking makes them feel real. If you were playing the game, you might not even notice it at a conscience level, but it's something you'd feel.

Last week I added eye movement. Characters can now look left and right. It adds a lot to even idles, as the characters appear to be looking around, aware of the environment. It's also really nice in conversations, because characters can actual look at who is talking to them. Before (and in previous games), characters would just stare forward. It's surprising how used to this you get, and when blinking and eye movement goes in, it's actually startling.

- Ron


Thimbleweed Park Podcast #55

by Ron Gilbert
Jul 10, 2016

Join us this week for a delayed podcast where David keeps dropping the M-bomb, so this one might not be family friendly. Have you talked to your kids about mazes?

You can also subscribe to the Thimbleweed Park Podcast RSS feed if that's 'your thing'.

You can also get the podcast directly from iTunes.

- Ron


My Mac Crashed Again

by Ron Gilbert
Jul 09, 2016

My Mac crashed again and won't fully boot, saying the drive is corrupt.  I now suspect it's Photoshop that is causing this.  The last time this happened, the night before I was working on a huge file and Photoshop started to tell me the file was too big, and then it was reporting it was unable to save the file.  The next day, my machine wouldn't fully boot due to the keychain being corrupt.

This morning, I was working on a large Photoshop file and I started to get the same errors, when I rebooted, my keychain was corrupt.

I'm going to head into the Apple store and see if they can fix it without a reformat this time.

Why am I telling you this?  Because I was going to put up the new podcast and that might not happen.

UPDATE

Back from the Apple store with a freshly reformatted machine and time machine pulled everything back.

I mentioned to the Genius Bar tech person that this is the second time it's hard crashed from editing a large file in Photoshop and he said "oh...", then we had a conversation that I can only assume was "off the record" by the way he spoke, tell me other people have reported drive corruption when extremely large files are process by fusion drives.

Yeah... no kidding.

I'll do a little Googling and see if I can find anything. Like I said in my previous post, I don't trust fusion drives and I guess with good reason.

I do need to re-edit the podcast, so that will go up tomorrow.

- Ron


Win! Win! Winners!

by Ron Gilbert
Jun 27, 2016

It's time for the phonebook winners.

From last week, then winners where:

P.Coltau
Nico
BertL
Mathias
Alberto

And the answer to the number of R entires is...

...drumroll...

133

We had several ties, so rather then rolling a dice and making some people cry, we're going to do the nice thing, because that is who we are.

McStorm
Francois Mercier
Michael Kohlhaas
Riccardo
Geoffrey Paulsen
Fernando
L.Larry
Hysteria

- Ron

P.S. I still have the podcast to finalize, hopefully that will go up tomorrow.


The Wrench Puzzle

by Ron Gilbert
Jun 23, 2016

A few blog posts back someone in the comments asked for some new art. I don't think I've posted this before, so here it is....

I'd love to share more art and animation, but we're getting to the point where most new art is riddled with spoilers. Not showing new art almost makes it look like we're not moving forward, but nothing could be farther from the truth. The game is getting downright exciting. Exciting, I tell you.

OK, one more... then that's it.

As we play the game and do more playtests, issues start to come up.  One of them we are now referring to as "The Wrench Puzzle".  Don't worry, it has nothing to do with monkeys and wrenches. Only a crazy person would design a puzzle like that. Crazy, I tell you.

There was a fairly long puzzle chain in Act 1 to get a wrench that unlocks a new area of the game. The puzzle had two problems.

The first was the moment you realize you need the wrench to progress, you had just solved another long puzzle chain that unlocked the room where the wrench puzzle is solved. At this point, you've been built up with anticipation, then you solve the first puzzle and bam! You now have to go solve the wrench puzzle and there is no forewarning.  Solving the first puzzle became a moment of disappointment rather than triumph.

The second issue is that Act 1 was getting really long and the wrench puzzle was contributing to that. It's a long and complicated puzzle chain, but it's an interesting puzzle and we didn't want to lose it.

So the solution we came up with was to move the whole puzzle chain from Act 1 to Act 2.  You no longer need the wrench to progress which makes Act 1 smaller and the returns the moment from disappointment to triumph.

It's what we in the biz call "win-win". Or maybe the younger generation calls a "double-win". But people in the know call it a "win-a-reno".

We did needed to come up with a different use for the wrench, but that didn't prove to be very hard, there was a puzzle just waiting for a wrench solution. And, as an added bonus, moving the puzzle chain from Act 1 to Act 2 involved very little work.

So now Act 1 is smaller and snappier and Act 2 is fuller and beefier.

- Ron


Win! Win! Win! Again!

by Ron Gilbert
Jun 22, 2016

It's time for our second and last Thimbleweed Park phonebook contest. We're going to giving away another 5 entries into the Thimbleweed Park phone book, complete with (optional) voicemail message (but who wouldn't want to do that).

The winners last week where:

P.Coltau
Nico
BertL
Mathias
Alberto

This week, guess how many people are in the R section of the phonebook!

The contest is open to everyone, even people who already have an entry.

Five closest guesses get an entry in the phone book and the opportunity to upload a voicemail message. Ties will be resolved using officially sanctioned D&D combat rules (the D20).

Post your guess in the body of your message in the comments section. The number must be on a line by itself.

In order to win, you must fill in your email address in the email field. DO NOT put your email address in the body of the message.  If you post multiple guesses, only your last one will count.

I won't be cross posting this on Twitter, since they have their own contest... so shhhhhhhhh...

We'll pick a winner Monday morning, live from Spain!

- Ron

CONTEST IS CLOSED

NO MORE ANSWER

STOP

WILL POST WINNERS ON MONDAY

STOP


Thimbleweed Park Podcast #54

by Ron Gilbert
Jun 19, 2016

In today's episode, we talk about redesigning a puzzle much later than we should, but that's what makes it exciting! Right! Right?

You can also subscribe to the Thimbleweed Park Podcast RSS feed if that's 'your thing'.

You can also get the podcast directly from iTunes.

- Ron


Win! Win! Win!

by Ron Gilbert
Jun 16, 2016

As a thanks to everyone who has been following the Thimbleweed Park blog and helping out with the game, we're going to giving away 5 entries into the Thimbleweed Park phone book, complete with (optional) voicemail message (but who wouldn't want to do that).

Guess how many people in the phone book (as of right now) have uploaded a voicemail, from A...

...to Z...

The contest is open to everyone, even people who already have an entry.

Five closest guesses get an entry in the phone book and the opportunity to upload a voicemail message. Ties will be resolved using officially sanctioned D&D combat rules (the D20).

Post your guess in the body of your message in the comments section.

In order to win, you must fill in your email address in the email field. DO NOT put your email address in the body of the message.  If you post multiple guesses, only your last one will count.

I won't be cross posting this on Twitter, since they have their own contest... so shhhhhhhhh...

We'll pick a winner Monday morning.

- Ron

P. S. We'll be giving away another five entries next week.

CONTEST IS CLOSED

WE HAVE OUR WINNERS

The answer was 1100

Congratulations to...

P.Coltau
Nico
BertL
Mathias
Alberto

You will be getting an invite email in the next few hours.


The New T-Shirts Are Here! The New T-Shirts Are Here!

by Ron Gilbert
Jun 14, 2016

Our fabulous mouse pads and t-shirts can now be purchased on Fangamer!  You'll look twice as style'n while pointing and clicking on your new Thimbleweed Park mouse pad wearing your new Thimbleweed Park t-shirt.

It's worth mentioning, these are not the backer t-shirts. Those will be twice as cool.  Or half as cool. We haven't decided yet.

- Ron


Thimbleweed Park Podcast #53

by Ron Gilbert
Jun 11, 2016

Two blog posts in one day! It's the end of times! Better listen to this podcast quickly before it's too late!

You can also subscribe to the Thimbleweed Park Podcast RSS feed if that's 'your thing'.

You can also get the podcast directly from iTunes.

- Ron


The TesterTron 3000™

by Ron Gilbert
Jun 11, 2016

While you're waiting for me to get off my lazy beep and edit the podcast, please enjoy this bonus video of the TesterTron 3000™ finding bugs so you don't have to.

- Ron


New Thimbleweed Park Teaser Video


Jun 06, 2016

Someone is watching you...


Thimbleweed Park Podcast #52

by Ron Gilbert
Jun 05, 2016

All your Friday Questions answered!*

You can also subscribe to the Thimbleweed Park Podcast RSS feed if that's 'your thing'.

You can also get the podcast directly from iTunes.

- Ron

*for small values of all.


Friday Questions

by Ron Gilbert
Jun 01, 2016

It's time for Friday questions!

You know the drill...

Post your questions for Gary, David or I to answer on this week's Thimbleweed Park™ Podcast and we'll do our best to answer them, or at least read them to ourselves and mumble under our breath "there is no way I'm answering that".

One questions per-comment and please try and keep them short. After two sentences, we just zone out and the chances of it being answered drop to zero. I hate to be a jerk (not really), but that's the truth. It's a cruel cruel world, best to learn that early.

YAY! Friday Questions!

QUESTION ARE NOW CLOSED

- Ron


Thimbleweed Park Podcast #51

by Ron Gilbert
May 29, 2016

[INSERT FUNNY DESCRIPTION HERE]

You can also subscribe to the Thimbleweed Park Podcast RSS feed if that's 'your thing'.

You can also get the podcast directly from iTunes.

- Ron


SPOILER: There Is Not A Door On Top Of The Vista

by Ron Gilbert
May 26, 2016

During one of the podcast I mentioned we were having some design issues about halfway through Act 1 and we were trying to find a good fix. I can excitedly proclaim our design demons slayed and here is what happened.

I'm going to try and be as spoiler free as I can, so excuse me if I mask some of the puzzles by calling them "doors". I promise that Thimbleweed Park is more exciting than finding keys to open a bunch of doors, but at it's core, that's what adventure games are. Sometimes during early design we will just call a puzzle a key and door. All that really means is something is blocking the way (the door) and something is needed to get past (the key). We'll figure out something more interesting later (like a rubber chicken with a pulley in the middle).

Of course, sometimes there is just a door and a key. Sometimes a cigar is just a cigar.

There is this point Thimbleweed Park where the world opens up. It happens about halfway though Act 1.  Imagine chartering Dread's ship in Monkey 2 and you'll get the idea.  The game starts out and players are pretty focused on the body and finding the killer, then they come to the vista and see the amazing panorama of locations they can travel to. Excitement takes over and they rush to the trail only to be stopped by a "door".

Remember back in paragraph two when I said I would use "door" as metaphors for puzzles to avoid spoilers? This is one of those cases. There is not a door on top of the vista. SPOILER: There is not a door on top of the vista.

When you present the opportunity to visit so many lovely locations, you can hardly blame players for forgetting about the pesky body and turning all their attention to the door on top of the vista, and that is exactly what they do.

Hours of hilarious and riveting gameplay later...

Players find the key (which isn't really a key) to the door (which isn't really a door) and they head out into the vastness of Thimbleweed County.

And they are lost. Not lost in the sense of which way is north or how do I get back to town, but lost in the sense that they totally forgot about the body and all the clues that were being laid.

I struggled with a lot of solutions to this problem, including making the door less sexy or forcing attention to the body (but who can resist a sexy door). In the end, I decide to leave everything as it was and add a small cut-scene.

When players unlock the door that isn't a door with the key that isn't a key, the second agent will show up and they have a conversion (via a dialog tree) and chat about what they still need do to solve the crime.

It works well because it refocuses players and provides a small recap. I was even thinking of doing something similar if you start up the game and it's been more than a few days since you played last.

Crisis number one averted, now on to crisis number two.

After getting past the vista, there is another door (that isn't a door... do I need to keep saying this) you need to get through. The problem with this door is that it isn't a very sexy door. Unlike the sexy vista door that you can see treasure behind, players have no idea what is behind this door. It's just a door. And to make matters worse, it's a door they saw very early in the game and probably forgot about. The key to this door is beyond the vista, so it couldn't have been opened sooner.

Now that players are beyond the vista, they have access to the key, but they could care less. We don't want to tell players what is behind the door because it's a surprise. We don't even want to nudge-nudge-wink-wink it. We really want it to be a surprise.

So players get past the vista, solve some more puzzles and then they just start wondering around.  Maybe they remember the door (that isn't a door!) and maybe they start to looking for the key (that isn't a key!) only because they are bored and it's a puzzle to solve while they compose their angry "this game sucks" post on whatever adventure game forum they visit too many times a day.

How to make the purposely non-sexy door sexy?

The solution was to put something else behind the door and tell players about that, but not the surprise that is really behind the door. Now players think there is something else they want behind the door (IT'S NOT REALLY A DOOR!) and seek it's key.

When they finally get in, they will stumble on the surprise, all the time thinking how clever they were, when in fact they were just being manipulated by game design.

"And that little Timmy is how you make a game."
"That's very interesting Uncle Ron, but can I go play Minecraft now?"
"Sure, whatever."

- Ron

P.S. The use of doors as a puzzle metaphor was only to confuse you, there is nothing interesting behind any of the doors in Thimbleweed Park.


Thimbleweed Park Podcast #50

by Ron Gilbert
May 21, 2016

The Thimbleweed Park Podcast turns the big 5-0 and we talk about super delegates and why they don't have their own comic books.

You can also subscribe to the Thimbleweed Park Podcast RSS feed if that's 'your thing'.

You can also get the podcast directly from iTunes.

- Ron


Schedule

by Ron Gilbert
May 18, 2016

In the State Of The Game #3 post, I mentioned the schedule we were working on to ship the game in Jan, and someone in the comments asked if I would show the schedule.

So without further delay... our schedule...

I'm a visual person. I need to see a schedule as colored lines depicting time's relentless march forward. I know some people like a list of dates and have no problem understanding that, but for me I need to see time. I want to sit back and squint and feel an overview of how long each task is going to take.  Seeing dates like "May 29 - June 3" gives me no sense of the time involved.

If I had some fancy gantt chart software, I'd do my schedules in that, but I also get sucked into fancy software and tend to waste too much time explore features and settings, so I prefer to do my visual schedule in a spreadsheet. It's simple and does what I need.

OK, so let's talk about the schedule...

First row is the ship date for the Mac, Windows, Linux and Xbox versions. Sometime in Jan 2017.  I start with this since it's the the immovable date.

We're going to start the Linux port this week and given we use SDL for Mac and Windows, I don't expect it to be a huge problem. We have top people working on it. Top. People.  The iOS and Android versions won't ship in mid-Jan, they will likely be delayed by a month or two. If things go well and I have more time than expected in Nov and Dec, they might ship sooner. If we had more money, we could hire people to do those, but we don't and it will probably fall on Malcolm (shh... I haven't asked him yet) or myself.

I tend to work backwards when doing a schedule, so the next thing we don't have a lot of control over is the Microsoft cert process. It can take anywhere from one to two months, depending on how many issues are found. We decided to plan for the worst and put it down as two months. There is a small milestone on Oct 1 for pre-cert, to see if there are any issues, but we don't have to submit a final build.  We might move that up a month or two and do it as soon as we have a stable xbox build with close to final ui.

Working back from there, text lock will be Oct 1. At this point, all the text needs to be final and a locked script can be given to the translators. We will also prep a recording script and we'll begin recording.  I am delaying this as late as possible and honestly, it should really be happening one or two months before this, but I've be spending a lot of time on the dialog. I'm not completely happy with how the dialogs are working and we need time to play with them. We don't have enough time for pickup lines and testing. This is going to be a stressful time.

In the middle of October we'll start translation art. Our plan is to translate any art in the game that has text in it. We'll compile a list and get them translated first, then make the art changes. I'll soon have a system in place in our engine what makes this pretty simple and should require no code changes, assume it was all set up correctly.

Next we come to the areas of the game and when each of those needs to be done. The game is divided into Act 1, Act 2, Act 3 and Epilogues After those are done, we enter a stage of game-wide polish where we franticly try and fix all the little crap we find and or didn't have time to fix during the sprints. This is the point where you look at something and say "no one will notice" and drop it off the fix list. 99% of the time, you're right and no one notices.

All the art will be done by mid July and then we go back and polish.

Music should all be done by July 1 and seems on track. There will be small fixes after that, but nothing major.

The game should be 100% done by Oct 1. Anything that changes after that needs to be "critical."

And it goes without saying that testing is a non-stop process.

So, that's the plan. What are the chances everything will go as planned? Zero percent, but that's what makes game dev so much fun.

- Ron


Thimbleweed Park Podcast #49

by Ron Gilbert
May 14, 2016

This week's bonus material contains spoilers! Are you strong enough to resist?

You can also subscribe to the Thimbleweed Park Podcast RSS feed if that's 'your thing'.

You can also get the podcast directly from iTunes.

- Ron


No Podcast This Week


May 06, 2016

nt


State Of The Game #3

by Ron Gilbert
May 04, 2016

It's been a while since I wrote a state of the game post. It was supposed to be done back in Jan, but then things happened.

I'm finding it harder and harder to write blog posts because the most interesting things happening right now on the project would be profound spoilers, but we shall forge forward, none-the-less, and-all-that.

On to the state-of-the-game.

How We Got Here

It's been a long road. We started working on this little game we call Thimbleweed Park a year and three months ago and I feel we've grown to be a nice little family, not just the team, but also everyone on the blog. The project progressed pretty peachy until October, then the holidays showed up and it felt like we hit a snag.  We had a lot of drive coming out of our first sprint, but then we puttered along after that.

Not sure exactly the cause, maybe a little burn out, accompanied with feeling a little overwhelmed with the monster of a game we'd created, but persevere we will and did.

Just about the time were were getting over post-holiday focus back, GDC showed up. Our original plan was to have an open-to-the-public party where people would get to play the game, but as we started making plans, we realized we just weren't to a place where we'd be happy with the game we had to show. On top of that, everyone was very busy, and organizing something like that was just too much work. We gave it a good try.

So we opted to do a press only showing of the game. When you're demoing to the press, it's a lot easier to do hand waving and divert attention from areas of the game that aren't finished or even slightly broken. The press are used to seeing games in this state and generally know how to interpret and project what they are seeing. This is fine for a first look, but not for a preview or a review, but that's all we were doing.

Prepping for the press demo took a lot more work than we anticipated. It hijacked the sprint we should have been doing as we instead entered a phase of polishing. None of it was lost work, it all had to be done anyway, it was just done out of order and distracted our focus.

Polishing included adding special case animations that we often leave until the end (in case the puzzle changes and it's not needed anymore), touch-ups on art, making sure all the verbs that make sense don't respond with "that doesn't seem to work."  We also added a lot of ambient background animation, like waving flags and twinkling stars, so the rooms had a static life to them.

For the demo, we decided to show an abbreviated opening to the game and then jump to the place where the Ransome flashback happens and began polishing and testing those areas.

Around this time, we also decided to switch our backer system to PledgeManager so backers could upgrade their pledges. What started out as a quick few-day project had spanned into weeks, all the while we were trying to get ready for GDC.

And... in the middle of all this, we decide to attend PAX East. Yet another distraction to endure. We briefly thought about showing one of the other flashbacks, but sanity prevailed and we took the GDC demo and continued to polish and harden it.

The GDC demos to the press were "guided" demos. They had the option of playing, but we were always by their side to help and warn. The PAX demos would be unguided. Players were left to their own devices to poke and prod wherever they pleased. We needed to make sure we plugged every hole. We needed to test as if it was a shipping project and this takes a lot more time. To the ThimbleTesting team's credit, no major bugs were found at PAX East, everything was rock solid.

Jenn's job on the project is the programming the Hotel and Franklin, since we weren't going to be showing her area, she was free to help set up our PAX booth and all the merch. As the pictures show, she did an amazing job with a very small budget. One of the smartest things she did was put two stools at each station so a friend could play. Adventure game are always better when shared.

Getting the demo ready for PAX took another 3 weeks out of our schedule. Again, none of it was wasted work, it was just distracting and felt like we weren't making any real forward progress on the game.

I was getting severely distracted with managing the project and struggled to find time to do programming that wasn't just fire-fighting bugs.

The role I've always wished we had was a producer, someone to manage all the schedules and sprints, and keeping an eye on the big picture while we forge ahead with puzzles and art.  It's a role I'd been taking on and the burden was starting to show. I was spending more time working on spreadsheets then doing programming, design and writing.

After some budget analysis, we decided to bring on Chase Martin as our producer, a role I wish we could have filled months ago. We didn't really have the budget for a producer for the whole project, but coming on at this stage was doable.  With Chase on board, I'm hoping to have more time to focus on my other three jobs. Hopefully it will make things better for the rest of the team as well.

The UI was starting to bug me. I love the C64 font, but seeing it on the screen really pigeonholed the game as a retro-game, despite it being much more than that. As more and more people looked at the game, we realized the font was becoming a limiting factor, much more than the verb UI.

Our goal has always been to capture the charm of the classic adventure games, but also to introduce them to a new audience without compromising what the game was. The C64 font was a hard thing for people to get around.

In the weeks leading up to PAX we tried a lot of fonts. Our tester builds had a new font every few days and none of them were clicking. We tried nice smooth truetype fonts, we tried pixelated truetype fonts, we tried crazy bitmap fonts and boring fonts. Nothing felt right. With the help of an outside designer we came across the font you see below. It is a hand-drawn pixel font. It's sharp and clear and you can see the pixels. It's a font we could have used back at Lucasfilm and it felt right.

The plan was, and still is, to retain the C64 font and allow players to switch with the press of a key.  If you like it better, then please play with it. It's a good font and we don't treat it as second class.

For the opening scene of the demo, we wanted a full screen shot of the agents at the body. Mark extended the screen just around the body to full screen. Once the opening was over, we'd switch on the verbs and be back to the black cropped verbs.

While installing the new font, I accidentally left some code commented out and the verbs were drawn over the background, without a black background, and it was stunning to see.  The game had a whole different feel. It took me around 10 seconds of walking around to realize that the whole game needed to be like this.

We had one week until PAX and our demo included over 15 rooms, all of which needed to be extended.

Oh... and Mark was gone for two weeks!

Octavi to the rescue as he took on the job of extending all the rooms in record time. Nothing playable happens below the interface, so it didn't need to be that interesting, and it actually wants to be uninteresting.

It really changes the feeling of the game significantly, but still retains the charm of the verb UI, something I didn't want to lose.

For those of you who want a more retro experience, not only can you switch back to the C64 font, you can also turn on the black verb background. But that's not all! Don't order yet! You can set the opacity of the black background to anything you want.

PAX went well. We had a great booth (thanks Jenn) and had hundreds of people playing the game. Almost everyone who sat down to play finished the 20+ minute demo and no one rage quit. I'll take this all as a good sign.

Where We're Going

Now it's back to work. We don't have any shows coming up in the next few months, so we can get back to focusing on the game.

As our projected summer release date got closer, I was starting to get really worried. Back in Sept, we had a lot of steam and it felt like we'd be done the following Sept or Oct, just a few months out from the Kickstarter date.  But, as we hit April it just didn't look like that was feasible.

Well, not feasible unless we all went into crunch mode.

I don't like crunch mode. I've done a lot of crunch mode in my career and made people do crunch mode over the many years of running projects and it's just not something we want to do. We don't have an oppressive publisher looking over us and we have the flexibility to make the game anything we want (thank you backers!).

When Chase came on as producer, we did a complete relook of the schedule to see how much work we had left to do and how long it was going to take us. If we don't crunch, the workload puts us out to mid October, but we also have to go through the Microsoft cert process for Xbox, which can take one to two months. That would put us out in Nov or Dec and that isn't a time we want to launch. It's important that the AAA games have their day in the sun, and we didn't want to distract from that.

The other option was to start cutting. I feel good about the scope and size of the game, I don't want to cut it down just to make a ship date.

In the course of making a game, you make a lot of cuts for design reasons, and those are good cuts that make the game better, but when you cut for schedule and budget, you run the risk of cutting meat and not fat. That said, it's often hard to tell the difference, sometimes you think you're cutting meat, when in fact you're cutting fat and you're better off. It's often hard to tell the difference when you're in the kitchen.

But in the end, I decided I didn't want to hack large sections of the game away just to make an Oct date.  We continue to make small cuts and refinements, but all those are to make the game better.

So we've made the decision to move the release of the game to January, mostly likely the middle to end of the month.

The budget is looking OK. With the addition of a few new and needed people, plus the extra time, things are getting tight, but we should still be good.

We raised a little bit of extra money through some angel investors for marketing and PR, two things that can be as important as making a good game. I feel good about using the Kickstarter money exclusively to build the game and the additional money to market it. It feels like a nice line, but it's also a little misleading. Marketing and PR is as much a part of building a successful game as music, art, and programming and they should be part of any budget.

In terms of the game, I think we're all feeling pretty good about it. It really feels like a good solid adventure game, just like we would have built back at Lucasfilm.

The one area that I'm worried about happens halfway through the first act. You unlock a large portion of the world and it's a great moment, filled with excitement and reward but players lose direction. It's a problem we'll probably solve with some good dialog and maybe a couple of new pinch points so there aren't too many new places to go. It's important to always give players focus. Player should always know what they need to be doing, but not always how they need do it. Being confused and lost is not a puzzle.

We started outside playtesting with testers culled from the readers of this blog. We did two people in Seattle and will now open it up to San Francisco and London. We have (literally) hundreds of people who signed up, so I don't know if we'll get to everyone.

As I've said many times on this very blog, doing playtesting is critical, but it can be time consuming. You have to organize people to come in, set up the location, spend several hours watching them, and on top of all that, you have to make sure the latest build works and is crash-bug free. It's a lot of prep and it's easy to keep putting it off, but resist the urge. Playtest! Playest! Playtest!

We have three bug testers on the project. Robert (lead tester) is full time and the other two are part time. We're looking to hire a fourth and that should round out the bug testing team until the end of the project. Our testers are amazing, some of the best I've worked with. Bug testing a game isn't fun and games. You're not being paid to play a game, you're being paid to break a game, then document it and figure out exactly how you broke it. It takes a special person to do this well, and they are gold when you find them.

What Scares Me

One thing that scares me at this point is the amount of work that needs to be done. It's a big game, but it needs to be. It's about the size of Monkey Island, 2 and to fulfill our promise of a "new classic adventure game", I feel it needs to be that size. I don't want to cut anything unless it makes the game better to do so.

At this point, it's about making smart decisions about the little things we can cut or rework to save time without compromising the game.

I actually enjoy that process. It's always been the fun part of a project for me. You need to make quick decisions about what is and isn't important. It really focuses you.

But it's also very stressful. It's one of the reasons I don't want to work crunch. Staying sharp can make all the difference.

Moving the game to January puts a lot of pressure on the budget. We had slop if anything went wrong, and although I wouldn't call moving the date "going wrong", it does eat up our budget slop.  There is no more runway.

That worries me, but I feel like we have it under control. I don't think I've ever worked on a project that didn't feel like this towards the end.

The last thing is the amount of playtesting the end game will get. We've done a lot of testing of the early game, but we're still putting the end together and it's not in a outside player playable state, plus it's hard to jump new testers to the end of the game, so we need to pull groups back in for a 2nd or 3rd round.

Thank you to our backers and supporters for making all this possible.

- Ron


Thimbleweed Park Podcast #48

by Ron Gilbert
Apr 30, 2016

We talk about PAX, Star Trek conventions and nerd out about rotation attach points, to which Gary says "Psssssspppt".

You can also subscribe to the Thimbleweed Park Podcast RSS feed if that's 'your thing'.

You can also get the podcast directly from iTunes.

- Ron


PAX East 2016 Report

by Ron Gilbert
Apr 23, 2016

We just finished the first day of PAX East and I thought I'd give a quick update.

Here is our Thimbleweed Park booth just before the gates were opened:

And here is a few hours later:

We had four stations to play Thimbleweed Park and they were full all day long, with a line several deep always waiting to play. The thing that excited me the most was - with the exception of a couple of people - everyone played through the entire 20 minute demo. That is always a good sign. You know you're in trouble when they leave part-way through.

As I mention in the podcast, we've done some work on the UI.  The big change is that we're taking all the rooms fullscreen, then floating the UI over the top. We also switch to a new pixel based font.

You can always switch back to the classic C64 font if you want.

The black bar under the ui was a holdover from the SCUMM days. Back then we didn't have the memory to do full screen room, nor the ability to overlay the UI. It took me a long time to realize that none of this was a constraint anymore and needed to go.

The other advantage is that during cut-scenes, you no longer have the ugly black area at the bottom of the screen. You now get fullscreen goodness.

I write more about this when I get back... Off to another grueling day on the show floor.

- Ron


Thimbleweed Park Podcast #47

by Ron Gilbert
Apr 16, 2016

Your constant reminder of how boring game development really is.

You can also subscribe to the Thimbleweed Park Podcast RSS feed if that's 'your thing'.

You can also get the podcast directly from iTunes.

- Ron


ThimbleCrash

by Ron Gilbert
Apr 11, 2016

A few days ago, I stumbled into my home office, a bowl of oatmeal in hand, getting ready for a quick check of the Twitters before my morning run, but oddly, my computer was off. I leave my Mac running all the time and it was strange that it didn't just wake up from sleep. I powered it on and everything seemed normal.

The machine will sometimes restart in the middle of the night, and when it reboots, there is a nice message box telling me that it crashed and kindly shows me the logs. This morning, no such message enthusiastically greeted me.

Odd.

The next day I was editing a very large Photoshop files -- touching on 4GB -- when it kept popping up these errors when I tried to save saying I didn't have the correct permissions to save.

Odd.

The next morning, I headed into the home office again, pre-run oatmeal in hand, and sat down to read the emails.  Most of the new email that arrived during the night had no sender or subject.

Odd.

A few seconds later, a message box pops up, asking me to enter my iCloud password, I hit cancel and switched to my browser and pulled up Twitter and then Chrome asked me for my Twitter password and had me logged out. I went to another site, and I had also been logged out and it was asking for my password again, then my email program asked me for my password, I entered it and hit OK, then a new message box come on saying the login group of keychain was missing and did I want to reset it.

Odd.

Something was going wrong and I decide to just reboot and see if things were magically fixed, because, you know, that might happen. Right?

As the machine was shutting down, it dawned on me that rebooting my machine when it was telling me the login keychain was missing might not have been the smartest idea, and I was right.

Half way through the boot process, the machine just shut down. Three more attempts with the same results. I booted in verbose mode and watched the boot process, everything was normal until it got to the disk check, then it displayed a slew of errors and shutdown.

Crap.

I booted in recovery mode and ran Disk Utility and checked the disk, sure enough, there were a crap-ton™ of missing block error messages. No problem, I'll just hit "Repair Disk" and be up and running again.

Nope.

Repair Disk informed me that it was unable to repair the disk. I was somewhat disappointed the Mac didn't emit a mechanical mocking laugh at this point.

I didn't have a Thunderbolt Cable, so I couldn't connect my iMac to my laptop and see if the drive was still readable.

I'm pretty religious about backing stuff up. Time Machine runs every hours and skips only my large video and audio files. It doesn't back up my projects and source code, but they are all in Git. I had made a few changes the previous day and I had not pushed, but it was just a few lines of code, easily retyped. The big thing I didn't have was backup of was my Windows VM.

Without it I can't do windows build for testing. Nothing of importance is on the VM except a install of Visual Studio. The VM could be rebuilt in an afternoon, so losing it wasn't climatic, just a pain. The one thing I was going to lose by doing a reformat was the podcast we did on Friday. I hadn't edit it yet, so it hadn't been archived for future generations to enjoy.

After a little more thinking about what might be on the machine and not backed up, I decided to reformat and reinstall from my Time Machine backup.

There was a very real possibility that this was a hardware problem and reformatting wasn't going to save the day. In that case, I was going to have to send the machine out to get the drive replaced and that would take several days, if not a week if I wanted Apple to do it under Apple Care. With PAX looming in a few weeks, that was not an event I welcomed.

I can do just about everything on my laptop, except make Windows builds, so it wasn't a catastrophe, just a big pain as half of our testing staff is Windows only.

I went into Disk Utility again and selected the volume, paused for a few seconds to contemplate the destructive nature of my next move, then hit Erase. A few moments later, I was informed that my drive could not be reformatted.

My iMac has what's called a fusion drive. There is a 128MB SSD drive and a 3TB spinning drive that are fused into one big drive. The OS is smart enough to move files you don't access very often to the slow spinning disk, keeping the files you need on the spiffy fast SSD drive. It's a great idea. The new macs have it, and it's been embedded in a lot of standalone drives, and there is a version for Windows machines.

The problem with fusion drives is you now have now have two points of failure. If either drive goes bad, you lose the data on both drives, which is what happened to me.

Apparently, while the iMac is happy to have a fusion drive, Disk Utility has not caught up yet, and there is no way to reformat it.

Gads.

At this point, I'm kind of stuck. All I want to do is reformat the drive and start over. Visions of days waiting to speak to Apple and weeks of waiting to get my machine back are dancing through my head, all while PAX stalks closer and closer.

I call up the local Apple store and see when I can get an appointment to visit the Genius Bar. I don't have a lot of faith in the Genius Bar to help with this issue. Normally it is filled with people trying to figure out how to get email on their iPhones. I imagine I'll bring the computer in and the "genius" behind the "bar" will shrug and tell me they need to send it in and there will be a two week wait, but if I'm having trouble getting email on my iPhone, they'd be happy to help.

I place the call and much to my surprise, they have a free slot at 4:45 that afternoon. Great. I pack the computer up and haul it in.

As expected, there are about 30 people being helped at the Genius Bar and other than a few laptops, they are all iPhones. I plop my giant iMac on the counter and wait, feeling quite out of place.

At 4:50 a nice person comes over and asks what the problem is. I tell him the machine won't boot due to a disk error. He then proceeds to talk to me like I'm a 4 year old, explaining that a hard disk has this spinny thing in them and sometimes those can go bad.

Seriously.

I then tell him I'm a Mac developer (I probably rolled my eyes), at which point he actually seems relieved and switches to full on nerd mode. He plugs my machine into the store network and boots from there, then proceeds to run some fancy diagnostic stuff I don't have access to. The good news is he doesn't find anything physically wrong with the drive.

He connects the iMac to my laptop and we mount it as a external drive. Everything seems to still be there, so I spend the next half hour copying the Windows VM and the podcast to my laptop and we reformat the machine using a bunch of shell commands, while he's happy to explain what is happening.

I ask why Disk Utility can't just reformat the drive. He says the Apple Utilities haven't caught up to the fusion drives and (politely) expresses some amount of frustration at this fact. I get the impression he's done this a lot.

I pack up the newly reformatted machine and head home. Time Machine restored perfectly, I then pulled all the repos from git, and other than needing to reenter all my passwords, the machine is back like nothing happened.

I know you hear this a lot, but back up your shit. This story would not have had a happy ending if I didn't back up everything obsessively.  I run Time Machine for local backups and use Arq to keep offsite archives on amazon's S3 storage (Time Machine can't help you if your house burns down).

I did manage to restore Friday's podcast recording, so I'll try and have that edited and up tomorrow.

I lost a day, but I got a nice clean desk out of it, so I'll call that a win.

- Ron


Pledge FAQ

by Jenn Sandercock
Apr 06, 2016

Jenn here. It's been a month since we launched our new upgrade and pledge system using PledgeManager.

Hopefully unbeknownst to you, I've been helping out with the customer support. Before we (re)launched I was totally dreading it. You hear all this stuff about customers always being right and demanding all kinds of outrageous things. I was also nervous because I know how many backers there are and I imagined thousands of customer support emails clogging up my inbox.

It turns out everyone's been just lovely! For the most part the system has worked pretty well and hasn't needed much work from me. So hugs all around and thanks for making my job easy.

That said... It looks like there's been a few common questions. So I thought I'd dedicate a blog post to these....

Why do you need more money? Didn't you get a bunch of money from the Kickstarter already?

Yes and we're using that to make the basic version of the game and all the stretch goals. But we want to make Thimbleweed Park even better by adding more art, more animation, more sound, more music. We need your help to make Thimbleweed Park even more amazing.

But wait, will that mean the scope and development time are increasing significantly?

No way! Many of our team are only working part-time right now. Your money will allow us to pay them for more of their time, which means more great stuff gets put in the game. It's not about adding new scenes, new puzzles or new features, it's about polish, polish, polish! It's about special case animations and more music variety. All the stuff that will make Thimbleweed Park blow you away.

I never got an email about all this PledgeManager stuff you're talking about! I want to be part of the party!

At the start of March you should have got an email from support@terribletoybox.com. If you didn't get it, you can request it again from PledgeManager:

Click here if you're a Kickstarter backer or backed during the campaign

Click here if you backed after the Kickstarter campaign

If you're not sure which link to click or you're still not seeing your rewards properly, email us at support@terribletoybox.com and we'll get you sorted.

I paid with PayPal, but PledgeManager still says I owe money! What's up with that?

It turned out that for a while PledgeManager and PayPal didn't talk to each other properly. Something about email addresses or not having physical addresses. Thankfully the wonderful PledgeManager people assure me they tracked down the problem and so no one should have any issues from now on. However, if you were affected by this, get in touch via support@terribletoybox.com. Let us know the email addresses you used with PledgeManager and PayPal and we'll make sure your account reflects what you actually paid.

I backed the phone book during the Kickstarter, but I never got an email about how to enter my voicemail message. I want my reward!!

We sent out emails at the start of February. If that email's been lost forever in spam or otherwise, let us know via support@terribletoybox.com and we'll resend your email.

I'm a new backer/backed after the Kickstarter, can I get the phone book?

On our Kickstarter page, we said that the Phone Book was a Kickstarter exclusive. While we could say that what we meant was that the price was exclusive and allow new people to get the phone book, we don't feel that's in line with what our Kickstarter backers thought we meant. So in order to be true to our promise to those backers, we can't let non-Kickstarter backers get the phone book. Sorry. We've learned our lesson.

I'm a Kickstarter backer and I upgraded to get the phone book now or I bought another phone book as an add on, where do I enter in my information and record my voicemail message?

You'll receive an email from us with all the details on how to put in your information. We've had a delay sending out those emails, but they will be going out soon. That email will also tell you your unique phone number in the game, so you can leave a message to call a friend if you want. We'll be extending the deadline on when the phone book voicemail messages need to be finished by. So don't worry, you'll have plenty of time to get it right. So keep your eyes peeled for an email us.

I pledged twice with the same email, but PledgeManager doesn't show me all my stuff and I didn't get a second Phone Book email. Give me my stuff!!!

You pledged twice?! First off, YOU'RE AMAZING!! Next... Neither PledgeManager nor our Phone Book system thought there would be people as generous as you. So most likely you'll only have one email from PledgeManager (there are some edge cases where you might have been got two PledgeManager emails, but probably not) and one email about your Phone Book entry. We're working on a solution to the Phone Book entries as we speak and will hopefully have that sorted soon. For PledgeManager, we're going to try to go through and find the names of everyone who backed multiple times manually. But since we might miss you, please get in touch (via support@terribletoybox.com) if your PledgeManager account doesn't reflect what you actually bought. We'll sort you out manually.

What is Ransome's Swear Jar, what are these tiers and why should we give you money?

We're still working out exactly how your name will be getting displayed in the game. If we do figure it out, we'll post to the blog. In the meantime, know that any the money you give us will be used to help make the game better. The swear jar has 3 tiers, $10, $20 and $30. The more you give, the more prominently your name will appear in the swear jar listing & we'll be able to make a better game for you too!

I added Ransome's Swear Jar, but my name didn't get linked to the add on OR I added my name, but I need to change it now. How can I do that?

As far as we can tell, there isn't a way to change the name associated with your Swear Jar entry. Likewise, if you accidentally added the Swear Jar without a name associated with it, PledgeManager has no way to add one after the fact. The easiest thing for you to do, is "unlock" your order again, remove the Swear Jar from your cart and then add a new Swear Jar to your cart, making sure to put your name in and spell it the way you'd like. Note: you can add more than one Swear Jar to your cart and have different names associated with each entry if you wanted.

I saw you giving away T-shirts on Twitter and at GDC! Are these the backer T-shirts? Why are other people getting their shirts and I still haven't got mine?

The shirts that Kickstarter Backers will get will be different. And the only way you'll be able to get one of those exclusive shirts is if you're a backer. We won't be giving them away to press or selling them or anything else. We're working on how and when to get the backer shirts out to you sooner without involving a lot of extra postage and so on. We'll let you know when that's getting finalised.

Backer T-shirts?! That sounds fun, I want one!

If you backed during the Kickstarter, you can upgrade to get a T-shirt via PledgeManager. If you're a new backer, sorry. There'll be other T-shirts you'll be able to buy, but it won't be the backer shirts.

I just want a T-shirt, any shirt!! Can I buy one/win one?

We'll be periodically doing giveaways via our Twitter account (@thimbleweedpark), so if you're lucky you might win something. If you'd like a more guaranteed way of getting a shirt... We're going to be selling those same shirts at PAX East. So stop by our booth (number 5169) within the Indie Megabooth to buy one. We're also investigating ways we can set up an online storefront to sell just these shirts, but that'll take time. So patience, please!

If you have more questions, ask away! I'm happy to help out. Put your question below if it's a general one and you don't need direct action from us. If you need personalised help, reach out to us (me) at support@terribletoybox.com and we'll do our best to get it all sorted. Please don't post personal requests in the comments.

- Jenn


Archive List

Cemetery - 69 comments - Jul 27, 2016

Thimbleweed Park Podcast #57 - 36 comments - Jul 24, 2016

Thimbleweed Park Podcast #56 - 34 comments - Jul 17, 2016

Eyes - 100 comments - Jul 12, 2016

Thimbleweed Park Podcast #55 - 38 comments - Jul 10, 2016

My Mac Crashed Again - 52 comments - Jul 09, 2016

Win! Win! Winners! - 105 comments - Jun 27, 2016

The Wrench Puzzle - 89 comments - Jun 23, 2016

Win! Win! Win! Again! - 359 comments - Jun 22, 2016

Thimbleweed Park Podcast #54 - 73 comments - Jun 19, 2016

Win! Win! Win! - 466 comments - Jun 16, 2016

The New T-Shirts Are Here! The New T-Shirts Are Here! - 47 comments - Jun 14, 2016

Thimbleweed Park Podcast #53 - 61 comments - Jun 11, 2016

The TesterTron 3000™ - 31 comments - Jun 11, 2016

New Thimbleweed Park Teaser Video - 151 comments - Jun 06, 2016

Thimbleweed Park Podcast #52 - 44 comments - Jun 05, 2016

Friday Questions - 160 comments - Jun 01, 2016

Thimbleweed Park Podcast #51 - 58 comments - May 29, 2016

SPOILER: There Is Not A Door On Top Of The Vista - 105 comments - May 26, 2016

Thimbleweed Park Podcast #50 - 124 comments - May 21, 2016

Schedule - 211 comments - May 18, 2016

Thimbleweed Park Podcast #49 - 67 comments - May 14, 2016

No Podcast This Week - 106 comments - May 06, 2016

State Of The Game #3 - 174 comments - May 04, 2016

Thimbleweed Park Podcast #48 - 104 comments - Apr 30, 2016

PAX East 2016 Report - 276 comments - Apr 23, 2016

Thimbleweed Park Podcast #47 - 134 comments - Apr 16, 2016

ThimbleCrash - 120 comments - Apr 11, 2016

Pledge FAQ - 70 comments - Apr 06, 2016

Thimbleweed Park Podcast #45 - 82 comments - Apr 02, 2016

Play Thimbleweed Park at PAX East - 43 comments - Mar 31, 2016

Friday Questions - 158 comments - Mar 30, 2016

Thimbleweed Park Podcast #44 - 32 comments - Mar 28, 2016

GDC 2016 In The Can - 121 comments - Mar 22, 2016

GDC or Bust! - 248 comments - Mar 11, 2016

Thimbleweed Park Trailer - 317 comments - Mar 03, 2016

Thimbleweed Park Podcast #43 - 37 comments - Feb 27, 2016

Elevator Speedrun - 74 comments - Feb 21, 2016

Thimbleweed Park Podcast #42 - 54 comments - Feb 20, 2016

WANTED: Playtesters - 58 comments - Feb 18, 2016

Thimbleweed Park Podcast #41 - 57 comments - Feb 13, 2016

Friday Questions - 110 comments - Feb 10, 2016

TextTron 3000™ - 76 comments - Feb 09, 2016

Thimbleweed Park Podcast #40 - 31 comments - Feb 06, 2016

Controllers - 146 comments - Feb 02, 2016

Thimbleweed Park Podcast #39 - 37 comments - Jan 30, 2016

Thimbleweed Park Podcast #38 - 46 comments - Jan 27, 2016

Thimbleweed Park Podcast #37 - 60 comments - Jan 19, 2016

No Podcast This Week - 62 comments - Jan 16, 2016

The Newest Code Monkey’s Report - 107 comments - Jan 11, 2016

Thimbleweed Park Podcast #36 - 15 comments - Jan 08, 2016

Pseudo Rooms - 90 comments - Jan 05, 2016

Thimbleweed Park Podcast #35 - 16 comments - Jan 01, 2016

Voicemail Testing - 59 comments - Dec 28, 2015

No Podcast For You - 41 comments - Dec 24, 2015

18 Minutes of Thimbleweed Park - 126 comments - Dec 22, 2015

Thimbleweed Park Podcast #34 - 40 comments - Dec 19, 2015

Special Case Animations II - 84 comments - Dec 14, 2015

Thimbleweed Park Podcast #33 - 17 comments - Dec 12, 2015

Refining Ransome - 83 comments - Dec 09, 2015

Thimbleweed Park Podcast #32 - 33 comments - Dec 06, 2015

The Podcast is Delayed Until Sunday - 58 comments - Dec 05, 2015

Friday Questions - 106 comments - Dec 02, 2015

I'm Just Going to Write - 144 comments - Dec 01, 2015

Thimbleweed Park Podcast #nan - 25 comments - Nov 27, 2015

Our First Playtest - 106 comments - Nov 24, 2015

Thimbleweed Park Podcast #31 - 43 comments - Nov 21, 2015

Happy Birthday Thimbleweed Park - 103 comments - Nov 18, 2015

Thimbleweed Park Podcast #30 - 42 comments - Nov 14, 2015

Early Brainstorm - 87 comments - Nov 10, 2015

Thimbleweed Park Podcast #29 - 36 comments - Nov 07, 2015

Friday Questions - 132 comments - Nov 04, 2015

Sprintastic - 58 comments - Nov 03, 2015

Thimbleweed Park Podcast #28 - 33 comments - Oct 31, 2015

Translation Baby Steps - 154 comments - Oct 26, 2015

Thimbleweed Park Podcast #27 - 39 comments - Oct 24, 2015

Save Game - 131 comments - Oct 19, 2015

Thimbleweed Park Podcast #26 - 33 comments - Oct 17, 2015

Thimbleweed Park Gameplay - 195 comments - Oct 12, 2015

Thimbleweed Park Podcast #25 - 40 comments - Oct 10, 2015

Team Thimbleweed - 133 comments - Oct 05, 2015

Thimbleweed Park Podcast #24 - 103 comments - Oct 03, 2015

Friday Questions - 205 comments - Sep 30, 2015

Occult Bookstore - 198 comments - Sep 28, 2015

Thimbleweed Park Podcast #23 - 27 comments - Sep 26, 2015

Slicy - 52 comments - Sep 21, 2015

Thimbleweed Park Podcast #22 - 29 comments - Sep 19, 2015

A Pixel Here a Pixel There... - 90 comments - Sep 14, 2015

Thimbleweed Park Podcast #21 - 36 comments - Sep 12, 2015

Budget - 133 comments - Sep 07, 2015

Thimbleweed Park Podcast #20 - 61 comments - Sep 05, 2015

The Secret of Monkey Island Turns 25! - 0 comments - Sep 03, 2015

Walking and Talking - 145 comments - Aug 31, 2015

Thimbleweed Park Podcast #19 - 52 comments - Aug 28, 2015

Friday Questions - 118 comments - Aug 27, 2015

State Of The Game #2 - 97 comments - Aug 24, 2015

Thimbleweed Park Podcast #18 - 23 comments - Aug 21, 2015

Radio Station - 102 comments - Aug 17, 2015

Thimbleweed Park Podcast #17 - 30 comments - Aug 14, 2015

Inventory Icons - 77 comments - Aug 13, 2015

Gamescom Debrief - 82 comments - Aug 11, 2015

Thimbleweed Park Is Coming to Xbox - 163 comments - Aug 04, 2015

Thimbleweed Park Podcast #16 - 85 comments - Jul 31, 2015

Occult Books - 1046 comments - Jul 27, 2015

Thimbleweed Park Podcast #15 - 30 comments - Jul 25, 2015

Gamescom 2015 - 49 comments - Jul 24, 2015

Cutting - 98 comments - Jul 20, 2015

Thimbleweed Park Podcast #14 - 28 comments - Jul 17, 2015

QuickiePal - 228 comments - Jul 16, 2015

The Drinking Fountain Whisperer - 168 comments - Jul 13, 2015

Thimbleweed Park Podcast #13 - 25 comments - Jul 10, 2015

Exploring Delores IIIII - 128 comments - Jul 08, 2015

Pep - 39 comments - Jul 06, 2015

Thimbleweed Park Podcast #12 - 16 comments - Jul 03, 2015

Exploring Delores IIII - 47 comments - Jul 02, 2015

Dialog Puzzles - 127 comments - Jun 30, 2015

Monday Post Delayed - 27 comments - Jun 29, 2015

Thimbleweed Park Podcast #11 - 42 comments - Jun 26, 2015

Office Areas - 52 comments - Jun 25, 2015

Special Case Animations - 66 comments - Jun 22, 2015

Thimbleweed Park Podcast #10 - 28 comments - Jun 19, 2015

Exploring Delores III - 29 comments - Jun 18, 2015

A Bus And An Elevator Walk Into A Bar... - 115 comments - Jun 15, 2015

Thimbleweed Park Podcast #9 - 44 comments - Jun 12, 2015

Design Dilemma - 30 comments - Jun 10, 2015

Exploring Delores II - 28 comments - Jun 08, 2015

More Mark Ferrari - 83 comments - Jun 03, 2015

Mark Ferrari™ Joins Team Thimbleweed™ - 108 comments - Jun 01, 2015

Thimbleweed Park Podcast #8 - 17 comments - May 29, 2015

Exploring Delores - 127 comments - May 25, 2015

Thimbleweed Park Podcast #7 - 23 comments - May 22, 2015

Almost Final Puzzle Dependency Charts - 32 comments - May 18, 2015

Thimbleweed Park Podcast #6 - 12 comments - May 15, 2015

Quick Sketching - 35 comments - May 13, 2015

State Of The Game - 72 comments - May 11, 2015

Thimbleweed Park Podcast #5 - 22 comments - May 08, 2015

TesterTron3000 - 66 comments - May 02, 2015

Thimbleweed Park Podcast #4 - 21 comments - May 01, 2015

Now With More Email Signup! - 25 comments - Apr 28, 2015

Walk Boxes! - 46 comments - Apr 27, 2015

Thimbleweed Park Podcast #3 - 21 comments - Apr 24, 2015

Comics On The Side - 26 comments - Apr 23, 2015

Act 1, 2 and 3 Combined Puzzles - 53 comments - Apr 20, 2015

Thimbleweed Park Podcast #2 - 35 comments - Apr 17, 2015

Thimbleweed Park Podcast #1 - 48 comments - Apr 13, 2015

Thoughts On Props - 46 comments - Apr 09, 2015

Engine Roadmap - 65 comments - Apr 07, 2015

Everyone Panic... Monday's blog entry delayed until Tuesday. - 12 comments - Apr 06, 2015

Parallax - 77 comments - Apr 01, 2015

Modernizing - 104 comments - Mar 30, 2015

Badges? We Don't Need No Stinkin' Badges! - 80 comments - Mar 26, 2015

Wireframing the Game - 34 comments - Mar 23, 2015

Your Kickstarter Dollars At Work! - 43 comments - Mar 20, 2015

Wimpy - 88 comments - Mar 16, 2015

The Big Decisions - 40 comments - Mar 14, 2015

What Can We Be Doing Better? - 104 comments - Mar 13, 2015

Pass One Of Act 2 Puzzles - 43 comments - Mar 11, 2015

Switching And Inventory - 103 comments - Mar 09, 2015

Characters! Characters! Characters! - 79 comments - Mar 01, 2015

Bonus Movie and Mr Spock - 31 comments - Feb 27, 2015

Brainstorming Like It's 1987 - 51 comments - Feb 24, 2015

More Maps and Puzzles - 49 comments - Feb 23, 2015

Missed the Kickstarter? - 13 comments - Feb 20, 2015

UI in Action - 92 comments - Feb 17, 2015

Monday Updated Pushed To Tomorrow. - 9 comments - Feb 16, 2015

Quickie Bathroom - 33 comments - Feb 11, 2015

Maps and Puzzles - 49 comments - Feb 09, 2015

Town Building Concepts - 36 comments - Feb 04, 2015

Scrolling Rooms - 58 comments - Feb 02, 2015

Not A Postmortem - 33 comments - Feb 01, 2015

Pigeon Brothers - 14 comments - Jan 30, 2015

Gypsy Store Concept - 36 comments - Jan 29, 2015

Taming the Design - 53 comments - Jan 27, 2015

We're Walking And We're Walking - 56 comments - Jan 25, 2015

Scripting Test - 73 comments - Jan 20, 2015

Thinking About Locations and Characters - 52 comments - Jan 19, 2015

Linux - 88 comments - Jan 15, 2015

Story Layout - 80 comments - Jan 12, 2015

Maniac Mansion, The Cave and Thimbleweed Park - 135 comments - Jan 08, 2015

ThimbleCon '87 - 33 comments - Jan 07, 2015

I Got Nothing Done - 32 comments - Jan 06, 2015

Engine - 60 comments - Jan 05, 2015

Important Question - 48 comments - Jan 02, 2015

Day 1 - 55 comments - Jan 02, 2015

First Post - 78 comments - Jan 01, 2015